Dr. Curtis Thorne publishes in Developmental Cell (March 19, 2018)

Curtis Thorne, PhD, and colleagues published a new study in Developmental Cell describing a simple, scalable method to culture 2D enteroid monolayers that, surprisingly, recapitulates many of the features of in vivo intestinal tissue and can be used for high-throughput microscopy-based experiments. Using this system, they systematically perturb WNT and BMP signals to reveal a core morphogenic circuit that controls proliferation, tissue organization, and cell fate or the intestine.

Welcome to our new students! (March 16, 2018)

CMM is delighted to welcome the following new PhD students who are entering the Graduate Program in Molecular Medicine: Alice Solomon, (Romanoski Lab), Austin Conklin (Romanoski Lab) and Rhye-Samuel Kanassatega (Colson Lab). We also extend a friendly welcome to the following Cancer Biology PhD students who will be working in labs with CMM faculty: Carly Cabel (Thorne Lab), Corbin Jensen (Warfel Lab) and Shekha Tahsin (Miranti Lab).

Congratulations Jacob Zbesko

CONGRATULATIONS to the UA ARCS Foundation Scholars for 2018-19! (click the link for more info)

Congratulations to CMM students named UA ARCS Foundation Scholars for 2018-2019 (February 23, 2018)

Cellular & Molecular Medicine PhD students John Ryniawec and Kelvin Pond have been selected as UA ARCS Foundation scholars for 2018-2019! This award consists of a $10,5000 cash scholarship, a $500 travel grant and full base tuition. Congratulations, John and Kelvin!

UA Study: Brain Liquefaction After Stroke is Toxic to Surviving Brain

Researchers at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson suggest liquefied brain fluid may be one cause of dementia after stroke.

UA Part of $8.9M Collaborative Grant to Understand How Dangerous Virus `Hides’ to Attack Another Day

Dr. Felicia Goodrum and several of the nation’s most prominent human cytomegalovirus researchers have been awarded a five-year, $8.9 million collaborative grant to investigate how the virus lies dormant until it activates and poses life-threatening disease risk.