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    Multidisciplinary program to train the next generation of biomedical scientists.

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    Collaborative research environment harnessing leading-edge technology and training.

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    Probing the mysteries of human health and disease.

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    Vibrant biomedical research campus situated in the beautiful Sonoran Desert Ecosystem.

A multidisciplinary PhD program focused on outstanding scholarship in the fields of immunobiology, molecular biophysics, and cell biology

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Over 50 Faculty and 30 PhD Students

The Cellular and Molecular Medicine (CMM) and Immunobiology (IMB) graduate programs have merged to create a new PhD program called the Graduate Program in MOLECULAR MEDICINE (GPMM). The GPMM at the University of Arizona is an interdepartmental, multidisciplinary training program fosters the development of scientists and educators who are prepared for lifelong participation in research and other intellectual pursuits. With an emphasis on bridging basic and translational science, Molecular Medicine students receive advanced training in the theory and practice of biomedical science. There are opportunities to investigate human health and disease ranging from biophysical studies at the atomic level, to modeling critical cellular process in tractable systems, to clinical research. The exposure and skills that students acquire prepare them for careers in biomedical research (including academia and the biotechnology industry), science education, journalism, and public policy.

Cell Biology

Cell Biology

To provide students with a foundation for understanding the cellular underpinnings of human health and disease, while advancing the field through hands-on, cutting-edge research.

Medical Biophysics

Medical Biophysics

Apply quantitative multi-disciplinary approaches to molecular and integrative biology with a goal to understand the biophysical basis of health and disease mechanisms, identify drugable targets and contribute to Precision Medicine.

Immunobiology

Immunobiology

Advance the insights into the rules of engagement that determine the outcome of host-pathogen interactions to develop future therapies for infectious, autoimmune and malignant diseases.

News

CMM Master's Student Receives 2019 Centennial Achievement Award (December 3, 2019)

Michelle Ennabe, CMM Master's Student, is one of three Masters Awardees of this year's prestigious Centennial Achievement Award.


Mouneimne Lab publishes mechanosensing study in Journal of Cell Biology (October 14, 2019)

In this newest study from the laboratory of Gus Mouneimne, PhD, Julieann Puleo and colleagues discovered that EVL, the Ena/VASP protein, is crucial for actin polymerization at focal adhesions (FAs). Importantly, they determined that EVL-mediated FA actin polymerization regulates FA maturation and mechanosensing, which are significant steps in mechanically-directed motility and durotactic invasion. This work is a significant contribution to our understanding of how cells interact with their microenvironment in normal and pathological contexts. PMID:31594807


Dr. Vercelli's research mentioned in the Washington Post (September 30, 2019)

Work from Donata Vercelli, PhD's laboratory recently featured in the Washington Post shows that living in traditional farming environments means living in a place that is extremely rich in microbes — the right microbes that our immune system has evolved to live with and learn from. The constellation of organisms found in soil and on farm animals programs how a child responds to allergens throughout her lifetime.