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    Multidisciplinary program to train the next generation of biomedical scientists.

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    Vibrant biomedical research campus situated in the beautiful Sonoran Desert Ecosystem.

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    Probing the mysteries of human health and disease.

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    Collaborative research environment harnessing leading-edge technology and training.

A multidisciplinary PhD program focused on outstanding scholarship in the fields of immunobiology, molecular biophysics, and cell biology

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Over 50 Faculty and 20 PhD Students

The Cellular and Molecular Medicine (CMM) and Immunobiology (IMB) graduate programs have merged to create a new PhD program called the Graduate Program in MOLECULAR MEDICINE (GPMM). The GPMM at the University of Arizona is an interdepartmental, multidisciplinary training program fosters the development of scientists and educators who are prepared for lifelong participation in research and other intellectual pursuits. With an emphasis on bridging basic and translational science, Molecular Medicine students receive advanced training in the theory and practice of biomedical science. There are opportunities to investigate human health and disease ranging from biophysical studies at the atomic level, to modeling critical cellular process in tractable systems, to clinical research. The exposure and skills that students acquire prepare them for careers in biomedical research (including academia and the biotechnology industry), science education, journalism, and public policy.

Cell Biology

Cell Biology

To provide students with a foundation for understanding the cellular underpinnings of human health and disease, while advancing the field through hands-on, cutting-edge research.

Medical Biophysics

Medical Biophysics

Apply quantitative multi-disciplinary approaches to molecular and integrative biology with a goal to understand the biophysical basis of health and disease mechanisms, identify drugable targets and contribute to Precision Medicine.

Immunobiology

Immunobiology

Advance the insights into the rules of engagement that determine the outcome of host-pathogen interactions to develop future therapies for infectious, autoimmune and malignant diseases.

News

Dr. Donata Vercelli is elected first female secretary general of the International Allergy Collegium (November 7, 2018)

Donata Vercelli, MD, Professor of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at the UA College of Medicine and Associate Director of the Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center at the University of Arizona Health Sciences, has been elected the first female secretary general of the Collegium Internationale Allergologicum. Founded in 1954, the Collegium is a group of distinguished international physicians and scientists who study the emerging field of allergy and clinical immunology. Dr. Vercelli has been a member of the Collegium for more than 25 years. As the organization’s new secretary general, she eventually will advance to the position of president after serving as the organization’s Vice President. Dr. Vercelli officially was inducted into her leadership position in early October at the Collegium’s 32nd symposium in Mallorca, Spain.


Dr. Balazs Kiss publishes in PNAS (October 19, 2018)

Balasz Kiss, PhD – a CMM postdoctoral scholar in Dr. Henk Granzier's lab - and colleagures recently published a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) about the role of nebulin, a giant sarcomeric, actin-binding protein found in skeletal muscle. Using X-ray diffraction, it was found that thin filaments are threefold more extensible in nebulin-knockout living muscle. Kiss and colleagues conclude that loss of nebulin's physiological function impairs other thin filament regulatory proteins and interferes with force generation - therefore, nebulin acts to stiffen thin filaments and is responsible for generating physiological levels of force.


Department of Immunology applauds the achievements of Drs Allison and Honjo (Nobel Prize, 2018) and their basic science discoveries that led to breakthroughs in cancer immunotherapy!

The Department of Immunobiology offers our heartfelt congratulations to Drs. Jim Allison and Tasuku Honjo for being awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. This award highlights the power of basic research, patience, and persistence.